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Driverless truck T-Pod

A Swedish firm has developed a driverless truck, which they hope will cut harmful emissions.

The vehicle - called the T-Pod - has been designed by Einride and the company have an ambitious target to have 200 T-pods running in their home country by 2020.

Einride CEO Robert Falck said: "Our vision is to enhance the lives of all people through the delivery of a global, impact-positive supply chain infrastructure.

"We don't believe our work is done when we've achieved carbon neutrality. Our design process is driven by our goal to have a net positive impact - whether that's improving the lives of transport workers or reducing road traffic accidents, every element of our system aims to have a measurable positive impact on the planet."

The pod measures 7 metres long and would be able to travel over 120 miles on a single charge. It could carry around 15 pallets, with a weight up to 20 tonnes.

Einride COO Filip Lilja added: "Einride is transforming the existing transport chain from the ground up. The big companies behind long-haul trucks keep building bigger trucks to increase efficiency, which ultimately means even more emissions.

"We are changing that by creating a secure solution that is not only cost-effective but dramatically minimises the negative environmental impact of the transportation industry."

And Einride's vision is to create a "global, impact-positive supply chain infrastructure".

They write on their website: "Our vision is to enhance the lives of a billion people through the delivery of a global, impact-positive supply chain infrastructure.

"That means we don't believe our work is done when we're carbon neutral. Our design process is driven by aiming to have a net positive impact - whether that might be improving the lives of transport workers, or reducing road traffic accidents, every element of our system aims to have a measurable positive impact on the planet.

"With a global vision, we believe that once we've improved the lives of a billion people, we will have reached terminal velocity, and achieving our mission will just be a matter of time."

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